Finding Home

Finding Home’s first review

Is wonderful.  It’s really more of a review of the entire series, which is even better.

There’s nothing quite so gratifying as someone I’ve never met loving my work.

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Categories: "Homesick", books, Finding Home, national parks, Repeating History, reviews, self-publishing, True Gold, writing, Yellowstone | Tags: , | Leave a comment

digital photos of paper books

Sorry, I can’t help myself.  The proofs of the last three Time in Yellowstone books arrived today, and they’re beautiful.  I need to tweak a couple of things (two of the covers have spines that are slightly off), then they’ll be approved for sale!

Anyway, without further ado…

True Gold's front

True Gold’s front

True Gold's back

True Gold’s back

Homesick's front

Homesick’s front

Homesick's back

Homesick’s back

Finding Home's front

Finding Home’s front

Finding Home's back

Finding Home’s back

And all four books lined up on the shelf!

And all four books lined up on the shelf!

 

I am so pleased I could pop.

Categories: "Homesick", books, Finding Home, geysers, Repeating History, self-publishing, True Gold, writing, Yellowstone | Tags: | Leave a comment

Wow, what a view

Wednesday my friend L and I did something we’d been wanting to do for a long time.  We went up to Crystal Mountain Ski Area, and we rode the gondola, which is open to sightseers in the off-season.  It cost twenty bucks, but it was worth every penny.  I really had no idea how far we’d be able to see from up there.  I’d been to Crystal to ski several times, but that was fifteen years ago, and even then I’d never gotten that high on the mountain (the easiest trail down from the top of the gondola is intermediate, and I never got much beyond high beginner trails the entire decade or so that I skied regularly).

Anyway, the day was about as clear and dry as it gets in the Pacific Northwest (and hot — 90+F in the lowlands, which broke records for this time of year, and in the upper 70sF even at almost 7000 feet at the top of the gondola), and the views ranged from Mt. Adams, clear down by the Columbia River, all the way to Mt. Baker, all the way up by the Canadian border.  And Mt. Rainier looked as if a person could reach out and touch it.

The only view even slightly obscured was down towards Puget Sound, where haze hovered over the water, blocking our view of the Olympics and of the cities down there (I bet the nighttime view in clear weather of those cities must be absolutely amazing).

There’s a fancy restaurant up at the top of the gondola, but it was beyond our price range, so we’d packed a picnic (actually, we’d bought our picnic at a Subway on the way), and we had plenty of chipmunk company while we ate.

All in all, it was a seriously spectacular trip.  If you happen to be in this part of the world on a clear day, don’t miss it.

Mount Rainier from the top of the Crystal Mountain gondola.  That's the White River down below.

Mount Rainier from the top of the Crystal Mountain gondola. That’s the White River down below.

That shadowy curve above the crags is Mt. St. Helens.

That shadowy curve above the crags is Mt. St. Helens.

Mt. Adams, and the tubs of flowers on the path to the restaurant.

Mt. Adams, and the tubs of flowers on the path to the restaurant.

Welcome to Crystal Mountain, elevation 6872 feet.

Welcome to Crystal Mountain, elevation 6872 feet.

That little white triangle on the horizon towards the righthand edge of the photo is Mt. Baker.

That little white triangle on the horizon almost dead center is Mt. Baker.

Lunch company.

Lunch company.

Really brave lunch company.

Really brave lunch company.

Headed back down the gondola.  Taken through the clear cover, so please excuse the reflections.

Headed back down the gondola. Taken through the clear cover, so please excuse the reflections.

Just a reminder, the Time in Yellowstone series: Repeating History, True Gold, and Finding Home, and the story “Homesick” (including chapters from all three novels, and only 99 cents for the e-version), are now available as ebooks on Amazon and Smashwords, and Repeating History is now available as a paper book from Amazon and CreateSpace, with the other books coming in paper editions very soon.

Categories: "Homesick", animals, books, exploring, Finding Home, flowers, Mt. Rainier, national parks, outdoors, parks, Repeating History, travel, True Gold, weather | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Finding Home and Homesick now available on Amazon and Smashwords

The E-versions of Finding Home and “Homesick” are now live on Amazon as well as Smashwords:

Finding Home, volume 3 of my Time in Yellowstone series :

Amazon

Smashwords

small Finding Home cover

“Homesick”, a short story in the same series, including sample chapters of all three novels, for 99 cents:

Amazon

Smashwords

small Homesick cover

For those who’ve been asking.

Paper editions of all four books to come, hopefully in a week or two.

Categories: "Homesick", books, Finding Home, self-publishing, writing | Tags: | Leave a comment

book news

First, the proof copy of Repeating History arrived in the mail today.  To say I am pleased and amazed falls rather short of the mark.  Not to sound like a cliché, but you know what they say about lifelong dreams?  Yes, that.

Anyway, here’s photos of the absolutely beautiful cover, if I do say so myself:

 

The front, obviously.

The front, obviously.

And the back.

And the back.

The photo is one I took.  The background texture is actually from the same photo.  And the design is all mine.  I couldn’t be more pleased.

I need to make a few small corrections, then I will be hitting the publish button and uploading the other three books in the Time in Yellowstone series to CreateSpace over the next week.  As soon as they’re available I’ll be posting links here.

Also, the third novel and a short story in my Time in Yellowstone series are now available at Smashwords.

Finding Home

“Homesick” , which includes chapters from all three novels, and is only 99 cents.

Both books are also being published on Amazon for the Kindle, and should be available in a day or so.  I will post those links here as soon as I have them.

Categories: "Homesick", books, Finding Home, geysers, national parks, outdoors, parks, Repeating History, self-publishing, True Gold, writing, Yellowstone | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

a brief and jubilant announcement

I just wrote “The End” on Finding Home, the third and last book in my Yellowstone novel set.  I had the original idea for them in September, 1999.  I was sitting in front of Grand Geyser, five incredible bursts, absolutely enthralled, when I thought, “Wow, this would make a terrific time travel device.”

Grand Geyser.  The eruption that started it all, in point of fact.

Grand Geyser. The eruption that started it all, in point of fact.

And now. 276,000 words (well, actually more like 350,000, but not all of them are in the finished product) later, here we are.  I should say, that’s 276,000 words for all three books in total, not just for Finding Home, which topped out at ~85,000 words.

Finding Home will be available for purchase later this summer.

Its predecessors, Repeating History and True Gold, are available through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, iTunes, and Smashwords (see links to the left).

Categories: books, Finding Home, geysers, national parks, Repeating History, self-publishing, True Gold, writing, Yellowstone | Tags: | 3 Comments

Finding Home, Chapter 1

I have posted Chapter 1 of my new novel Finding Home, the concluding story of my Yellowstone series, on my website.  I am well into the manuscript, and I hope to have the book published by late spring.

I hope you enjoy this preview.

Categories: books, Finding Home, self-publishing, website, writing | Leave a comment

Once upon a time on a trip to Alaska, day 45

Fullerton, California

Monday, July 30, 1973

HOME!!!”  Which is all that my diary says for that day.  And plenty.

Just out of curiosity, I put our itinerary into Google maps’ directions screen, and discovered that in 45 days, we went roughly 7600 miles, not counting side trips or out-and-backs.  That equals roughly 180 miles a day.  Which really doesn’t sound like much, until you think about it being the equivalent of 180 miles every single day for 45 days.

When I was forty years old, I made what I still refer to as my Long Trip (uppercase intentional).  I drove over 14,000 miles by myself in a little under three months.  I went from here near Seattle across the top of the U.S. to Vermont, down the east coast to Florida, then across the South and Southwest to California, where I rolled my car in the middle of the Mojave Desert.  I then managed to make my way to my sister’s home in the Bay Area and flew home from there.  A year ago I blogged that journey day by day.  Like our Alaska trip, this was another journey from which I still date events in my life.  It was one of the best things I ever did.  The really funny thing is, I drove an average of almost exactly 180 miles a day on that trip, too.  And I thought I was being leisurely about it.

I am hoping to make another Long Trip in a year or two, if I can afford the gas and figure out what to do with my two cats for the duration (for my last long trip, the pair I had at the time went to stay with a friend, but I don’t want to impose on her twice).  This time I want to drive across the middle of the U.S. and come back across Canada.  If I do, I hope to blog it in realtime, or as close as I can manage given where and when I can find wifi.

Anyway, for all of you who stuck with me through forty-five days of driving to Alaska and back, I hope you’ll stick around to see where I’m going in the future.

And I hope you will want to check out my novels:

Repeating History is the first of my Yellowstone stories, and is available from Amazon, Smashwords, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes.  It is about a young man, Chuck McManis, who, by virtue of being in absolutely the wrong place at the wrong time, is flung back in time from 1959 to 1877 in Yellowstone National Park, straight into the middle of an Indian war — the flight of the Nez Perce to Canada, pursued by the U.S. Army — and into his own family’s past.

True Gold  is the second in this series, and picks the story up in the next generation.  It is available through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Smashwords.  It is the story of Karin Myre, a Norwegian immigrant teenager living in Seattle, who decides to escape a future of too much drudgery and no choices by running off to the Klondike Gold Rush in 1897.  Stowing away on one of the many overcrowded ships bound north, she finds herself trapped in the cargo hold with a crowd of second thoughts.  But her rescue from the captain and a fate worse than death by a determined young prospector from Wyoming and his photographer partner is only the beginning of her search for a future of her own making.

The third novel, tentatively titled Finding Home, picks up the story of the widowed father Chuck left behind in Repeating History, his search for his lost son, and what that search reveals to him about his own murky past.  It will be available for purchase in the spring of 2013.

Categories: Alaska trip, books, cats, exploring, Finding Home, highways, Long Trip, national parks, philosophy, Repeating History, self-publishing, travel, True Gold, writing, Yellowstone | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

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